The Strange World of Gurney... View large image
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Film Details

Directed by: Various (TV)

Produced: 1960

Countries & Regions: United Kingdom

DVD Details

Certificate: PG

Length: 150 mins

Format: DVD

Region: Region 2

Released: 15 August 2011

Cat No: 7953388

Extras:
Languages(s): English
Interactive Menu
Screen ratio 1:1.33
Dolby Mono

Moviemail Details

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The Strange World of Gurney Slade

Cast: Dilys Laye , Anthony Newley , Edwin Richfield , Bernie Winters , Anneke Wills , Janina Faye

DVD
Availability: On Order, dispatched within 5 - 10 days. Delivery Times

All six episodes of the early 1960s comedy series starring Anthony Newley as an actor who inhabits a fantasy world. While working on a TV... Read More

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All six episodes of the early 1960s comedy series starring Anthony Newley as an actor who inhabits a fantasy world. While working on a TV soap-opera, Gurney Slade (Newley) walks off the set in disgust, only to find he has entered his own surreal interpretation of the world around him. As he walks through the streets of London, hearing the thoughts of the passers-by, he quickly discovers he can have a conversation with anything he wants to, be it animal, vegetable or mineral...

When someone gets round to writing a History of British Cult TV, they’ll need to take account of this fascinating curio, overlooked at the time but now justly celebrated (by David Bowie, among others) as an oddball treasure in which Anthony Newley wanders off the set of a dreary-looking sitcom and begins a series of peregrinations and daydreams in urban and pastoral settings.

The scripts, by Sid Green and Dick Hills (future writers for Morecambe and Wise), mostly amble pleasantly along, doing cheeky things with what was then TV convention, and you have to remind yourself that this was daring stuff in 1960. It’s been described as ‘a cross between Monty Python and The Prisoner’, but its affable surrealism puts it closer to The Running, Jumping and Standing Still Film (made in the same year) or NF Simpson’s One Way Pendulum. Until, that is, the final two episodes, when the tone shifts to something darker, and the writing sharpens noticeably. The very last scene of all could even unsettle hardened Twilight Zone fans.

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