Four Flies on Grey Velvet View large image

Film Details

Directed by: Dario Argento

Produced: 1971

Countries & Regions: France, Italy

DVD Details

Certificate: 18

Studio: Shameless

Length: 100 mins

Format: DVD

Region: Region 2

Released: 30 January 2012

Cat No: SHAM035

Extras:
Languages(s): Italian, English
Subtitles: English
Interactive Menu

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Four Flies on Grey Velvet

Cast: Jean-Pierre Marielle , Mimsy Farmer , Bud Spencer , Michael Brandon , Calisto Calisti , Aldo Bufi Landi

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Dario Argento’s early Giallo thriller in which a musician’s accidental killing of a stalker leads him into a web of intrigue and deceit.... Read More

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Dario Argento’s early Giallo thriller in which a musician’s accidental killing of a stalker leads him into a web of intrigue and deceit. Roberto (Michael Brandon) is a drummer in a successful rock band. One of the pitfalls of stardom is becoming the subject of other people’s obsessions, but when Roberto confronts a stalker one night only to end up stabbing him in the ensuing struggle, he finds himself dealing with a far bigger problem than fan adoration. A masked man has a photograph of Roberto committing the murder and sets out to blackmail him...

Virtually all of cult director Dario Argento's films have found their way on to the DVD medium, often in splendid transfers - as here. The film is by no means one of Argento's finest, but is nevertheless crammed with the kind of imagery that has made his films such cult successes. Rock drummer Roberto, played by the American actor Michael Brandon, is stalked by a mysterious figure, who he then follows in to what he thinks is an empty theatre. Roberto finds himself engaged in a fight, and stabs the assailant with his own knife. While this is happening, a masked figure has photographed the struggle, and Roberto is the victim of what appears to be a blackmailing scheme. All, of course, is not as it seems, and the murder in the theatre may not have happened at all. This was Argento's third film in the genre, and it is clear that he was beginning to spread his wings in terms of reinventing a genre that had already calcified into cliché. The main problem with the film is the uninspiring performance by Michael Brandon, delivering far less in the way of intriguing torment than (for instance) David Hemmings in Deep Red or other more charismatic male leads. Similarly, Mimsy Farmer as the female lead delivers a standard performance that doesn't make much of a mark. But many of the Argento's visual trademark flourishes are firmly in place, and the film remains essential viewing for those interested in the development of the director's technique.

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