Fantasia (Special Edition) View large image

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DVD Details

Certificate: U

Studio: Walt Disney Home Video

Length: 120 mins

Format: DVD

Region: Region 2

Released: 28 March 2011

Cat No: BUA0151501

Extras:
Languages(s): English, Dutch, Russian
Hard of Hearing Subtitles: English
Subtitles: English, Dutch, Russian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Estonian
Interactive Menu
Scene Access
Screen ratio 1:1.33
Dolby Digital 5.1

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Fantasia (Special Edition)

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Ambitious animated epic from Disney studios, which includes sequences set to music by - amongst others - Bach, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky,... Read More

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Ambitious animated epic from Disney studios, which includes sequences set to music by - amongst others - Bach, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, Mussorgsky, Schubert and Beethoven. Also featured is the famous ’Sorcerer’s Apprentice’ routine, in which Mickey Mouse (voiced by Walt himself for the last time) creates magical mayhem when he tries to get his chores done with the aid of a spell or two.

The 1930s were arguably the golden age of animation; certainly the end of that decade marked Walt Disney’s creative peak.

After the triumph of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves in 1938, Disney unleashed another couple of all-out classics: Pinocchio and Fantasia. Neither of them actually turned a profit on their original release, and Fantasia didn’t break even until the late 1960s when music and bright colours were where it was really at.

But what a tremendous piece of work it is, unflaggingly inventive, deftly switching between the sinister, the spectacular and slapstick.

The Sorcerer’s Apprentice is rightly considered the film’s dramatic centrepiece, and The Dance of the Hours its comic highlight, but the whole thing abounds with gorgeously rendered sequences.

The animators are bold in their use of colour and unafraid to dabble in the abstract; and even in segments that now seem a tad misconceived, such as the fluffy pastel colours and frolicking centaurs in Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony, there are gags and painterly touches to admire.

Anyone with the vaguest interest in animation should have Fantasia in their collection.

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