Bob Le Flambeur View large image

Film Details

Directed by: Jean-Pierre Melville

Produced: 1955

Countries & Regions: France

DVD Details

Certificate: PG

Length: 96 mins

Format: DVD

Region: Region 2

Released: 13 November 2006

Cat No: OPTD0661

Extras:
Languages(s): French
Subtitles: English
Interactive Menu
Screen ratio 1:1.33
Dolby Mono

Moviemail Details

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Bob Le Flambeur

Cast: Howard Vernon , Daniel Cauchy , Roger Duchesne , Isabelle Corey , Guy Decomble , Gerard Buhr , Simone Paris , Claude Cerval , Colette Fleury , René Havard , Henry Allaume

DVD
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Jean-Pierre Melville directs this pre-New Wave classic, chronicling a raid on a Parisian casino. Bob the Gambler (Roger Duchesne) reverts... Read More

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Jean-Pierre Melville directs this pre-New Wave classic, chronicling a raid on a Parisian casino. Bob the Gambler (Roger Duchesne) reverts to his old trade as a bank robber after several bad rolls of the dice. However, his plans to rip off a casino are thrown into chaos by an unforeseen murder and the duplicitous scheming of his criminal colleagues.

Bob Montagné is the gambler of the title, a one-time criminal hatching a last plan to spring the safe at the Deauville casino after being cleaned out there in a gambling session. Can his assembled gang see the plan through before the boastful pillow talk from Bob's protégé Paolo to the enigmatically vague-but-straightforward Anne finds its way to the police?

Filmed mostly in the streets and the back rooms of late-night clubs in Montmartre, there are so many stylistic touches here now associated with the nouvelle vague that it comes as a surprise to find that Melville's film is from 1955, predating the movement by some way. There's the gangster theme, a jaunty camera angle here and a humorous musical cue there, screen wipes, ironic narration and the inclusion of ambient background sound, all of which makes for an exciting piece of filmmaking that has an assured lightness of touch and still looks as fresh today as Godard's A bout de souffle, which took its lead from Melville's earlier film.

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