Black Jack View large image
Recommended

Film Details

Directed by: Ken Loach

Produced: 1979

Countries & Regions: United Kingdom

DVD Details

Certificate: PG

Studio: British Film Institute

Length: 98 mins

Format: DVD

Region: Region 2

Released: 21 June 2010

Cat No: BFIVD844

Extras:
Languages(s): English
Interactive Menu

Moviemail Details

Returns Policy
If you are unhappy with your purchase, you can return it to us within 30 days. More Details

Black Jack

Cast: William Moore , Stephen Hirst , Jean Franval , Phil Askham , Patti Nicholls , Andrew Bennett , Doreen Mantle , Russell Waters , Brian Hawksley , Louise Cooper , Packie Byrne , Joyce Smith

DVD
Availability: On Order, dispatched within 5 - 10 days. Delivery Times

Ken Loach directs this adventure film based on the children’s novel by Leon Garfield. Set in mid-18th century Yorkshire, the film tells... Read More

£15.99

£9.99

£6.00

MovieMail Rating:
  • Currently 0.00/5
(Read Review)

Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Your Rating:
  • Currently 0.00/5
(Submit Review)

Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

, 0.0 out of 5 based on 0 ratings

Ken Loach directs this adventure film based on the children’s novel by Leon Garfield. Set in mid-18th century Yorkshire, the film tells the tale of Black Jack (Jean Franval), a huge but gentle Frenchman who miraculously survives a hanging at the gallows in York and escapes into the countryside with two young companions he meets along the way, Tolly (Stephen Hirst) and asylum escapee Belle Carter (Louise Cooper). There the trio of outcasts finally find a family of sorts in one another and end up joining a travelling carnival troupe.

Ken Loach is one of the more dependable figures in world cinema, seldom straying from the politically engaged social realism with which he is synonymous. The period drama Black Jack is therefore something of an oddity in his career. Typical neither of its director nor its genre, it is an uncharacteristic film, but it’s a thoroughly worthwhile one nonetheless.

Black Jack himself is a rascally French sailor (Jean Franval), who first cheats death, then press-gangs Tolly, a young apprentice, into helping him escape; the two are soon embroiled in a series of picaresque adventures. Along the way, they meet Belle, a young girl escaped from the asylum. When she is reclaimed by the doctors, her friends decide upon rescue.

What’s interesting is how much Loach stamps his mark on proceedings. There are characteristically naturalistic performances and a greater emphasis on social class than you get with, say, Merchant-Ivory. Best of all though is Chris Menges’ sumptuous photography, which is absolutely comparable to Barry Lyndon.

Submit your review

It's Not too Late to add these...