Tenebrae View large image

Trailers...

Film Details

Directed by: Dario Argento

Produced: 1982

Countries & Regions: Italy

DVD Details

Certificate: 18

Studio: Starz Home Entertainment (Anchor Bay)

Format: DVD

Released: 23 October 2006

Cat No: PWD4196

Moviemail Details

Returns Policy
If you are unhappy with your purchase, you can return it to us within 30 days. More Details

Tenebrae

Cast: John Saxon , Giuliano Gemma , Anthony Franciosa , John Steiner , Daria Nicolodi , Guiliano Gemma , Lara Wendel , Veronica Lauria , Christian Borromeo , Carola Stagnaro , Eva Robins , Ania Pieroni , Veronica Lario

DVD
Availability: Not available.

King of Grand-Guignol bloodbaths Dario Argento directs this notorious horror flick from 1982. Peter Neil (Anthony Franciosa) is a mystery... Read More

MovieMail Rating:
  • Currently 0.00/5
(Read Review)

Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Your Rating:
  • Currently 0.00/5
(Submit Review)

Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

, 0.0 out of 5 based on 0 ratings

Not available

Add to wishlist

King of Grand-Guignol bloodbaths Dario Argento directs this notorious horror flick from 1982. Peter Neil (Anthony Franciosa) is a mystery writer in Rome to promote his new novel. His stay is disturbed by a crazed maniac who begins a terrifying murder spree, stuffing his victims’ mouths with pages from Neils’ books...

Another Blu-ray Dario Argento revelation. With Tenebrae (1982), the director's enthusiasts can savour, at their leisure, all the brilliant visual imagination of this Italian master of the horror film - nobody else in the field (not even Brian De Palma at his best) could (at that time) wield a camera with such elegance. Here, a contrived plot and perfunctory characters are effortlessly transcended by sequences such as the astonishing camera 'prowl' around the house of two murder victims. To the accompaniment of a pounding score by members of Argento's usual collaborators, Goblin, the director forsakes the supernaturalism of Suspiria and Inferno for a Hitchcockian plot involving a writer (Anthony Franciosa) plagued by a black-gloved murderer. Mention of Hitchcock is very relevant, as his ghost broods over the film (look at the sequence where Franciosa's agent John Saxon waits in a shopping precinct before a murderous knife assault: the steady accumulation of menace through innocuous sights and sounds - shoppers, children - is as brilliantly handled as Tippi Hedren's wait by the school-house in The Birds).

Submit your review

It's Not too Late to add these...