Metro-Land View large image
Recommended

Film Details

Directed by: Edward Mirzoeff

Produced: 1973

Countries & Regions: United Kingdom

DVD Details

Certificate: E

Studio: Upfront Entertainment

Length: 50 mins

Format: DVD

Region: Region 0

Released: 30 June 2014

Cat No: UPE0223

Extras:
DVD 5
Languages(s): English
Interactive Menu
Scene Access
Screen ratio 1:1.66

Moviemail Details

Returns Policy
If you are unhappy with your purchase, you can return it to us within 30 days. More Details

Metro-Land

Cast: John Betjeman

DVD
Availability: This item In Stock and will be dispatched within 48 hours. Delivery Times

British poet John Betjeman presents this classic 1970s television documentary, a colourful and eccentric eulogy to the people and places... Read More

£24.99

£17.99

£7.00

MovieMail Rating:
(Read Review)
Customers Rating:
(Submit Review)

, out of based on ratings

British poet John Betjeman presents this classic 1970s television documentary, a colourful and eccentric eulogy to the people and places served by London Underground’s Metropolitan Line.

‘This is a good parcel of English soil in which to build home and strike root, inhabited from old, as witness the lines of camps on the hill tops and confused mounds amongst the woods, the great dyke which crossed it east and west, the British trackways … the new settlement of Metro-land proceeds apace, the new colonists thrive amain.’ Thus the Metropolitan Railway promoted ‘Metro-land’ – the term coined by its publicity department for the outer reaches of its lines to the north-west of London – in the late 1920s, and here, in a celebrated film made for the BBC in 1972, ‘poet and hack’ John Betjeman delves into the spirit of the place.

Betjeman often referenced the area in his poetry (‘Harrow-on-the-Hill’, ‘Middlesex’, ‘The Metropolitan Railway’), and here pays reflective tribute to the ‘mild home county acres,’ appraising both the oddities and the normality of the place.

When first shown, Metro-Land was pronounced an ‘instant classic’, with Clive James predicting it would still be shown come the Millenium. It still is being shown and rightly so; it’s as endearingly eccentric as Betjeman himself.

Submit your review